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Wild Boar hunting

Wild boar hunting is for any hunter in need of excitement! When a massive male (keiler) crosses your path at full speed on a driven hunt, you must know how to shoot a running target, and get out of the way quickly if he comes too close! Worldwide, one of the most popular methods for…

Wild boar hunting is for any hunter in need of excitement! When a massive male (keiler) crosses your path at full speed on a driven hunt, you must know how to shoot a running target, and get out of the way quickly if he comes too close! Worldwide, one of the most popular methods for hunting boar is driven hunting, and this action-packed form of hunting is quite addictive when wild boars cross your stand from all directions. Bait and wait hunting at feeding stands is also quite popular on several continents, and the challenge of trying to sit still enough for the massive keiler to come in is really exciting. Many of our outfitters offer individual stalks for wild boar, which are super intense, and in many places can be arranged all year round, due to farmers protecting their fields and limited regulations in their hunting season.

Wild boar comes in many different subspecies, colours, and sizes. In general, throughout different continents, the wild boar is mainly active at night, and a feeding stand or a driven hunt is often needed to draw them out of the dense forest. Both the male, in Europe called a keiler, and the sow have tusks, but the keilers grow much bigger and wider, as their body size is also a lot bigger than the females’. Wild boar is commonly social animals and lives in family groups with one dominant female, other females, young females, young males, and yearlings. The males are kicked out of the group when they reach a certain age and start a lonesome life, or form small bachelor groups. The mature keilers are known to live entirely on their own, only interfering with other wild boars during the mating season.

The tusks grow long, and are used as weapons against predators or when fighting!

The trophy of the wild boar, and especially of the keiler, is the tusks. These can be incredibly sharp, as they grow from the lower jaw against the small teeth of the upper jaw, and are sharpening each other. The tusks are very dangerous to hunters dealing with an angry boar, as the tusks are the same height as a man’s thigh. Every year, many hunters suffer heavy injuries from wild boar.

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  • A wild boar can maintain a running speed of 35 k/h and has razor-sharp tusks
  • The most popular hunting type is driven hunting, followed by stalking and bait and wait at feeding stands
  • A good hit on the shoulder will hit vital organs, and kill the wild boar

Wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) are found in many sizes, shapes and colours and have many subspecies around the world. The size of the wild boar differs a lot depending on habitat, access to food and genetics. An adult keiler weighs on average around 200-300 lbs. but in several regions of Europe keilers are known to exceed 550 lbs. living weight. The shoulder height of an adult male wild boar is around 2,5-3 feet. The female weighs an average of around 140-190 lbs. with a shoulder height of up to 2,5 feet. The skin of the wild boar has very long and bushy hairs in the wintertime with a thick mane on the neck of the male keilers.

Both male and female wild boar have tusks, but they grow largest in the mouth of a male keiler. If the tusks exceed 7-8 inches they are considered big. Very rarely, the keiler breaks off the upper tusks, making the lower ones grow very long and curvy. A classic mount for a wild boar is to have the tusks from both the lower- and upper side mounted on a wooden board, with a silvery oak leaf between them. More and more hunters choose a shoulder mount for their trophy keiler, which is also a fantastic trophy. To reach medal size the tusks must score:
Bronze: 15     Silver: 19 5/16     Gold: 22 3/16

Wild boar eats as well almost anything, even dead animals and deer fawns, but most of the food they eat is plant-based. The mating season lasts from the late fall into wintertime, and the sow is pregnant for 133-140 days before giving birth to 4-6 piglets, but in rare cases, sows can give birth to more than 10-12 at once. The females are already reproductive at one year of age, and the males at two years. After the mating season, the keiler will have lost up to 20% of its bodyweight from chasing females, fighting, and eating less. Wild boar is known to be able to live for up to 10-14 years, but only a few individuals survive more than 5-6 years.