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Impala hunting

Impala hunting is for the hunter who are looking for a classic African trophy. The black horns, and the elegant expression, is highly sought-after for the first-time hunter in Africa. The typical type of hunting is a walk and stalk, where you will be glassing over the land, to find a good impala ram. The…

Impala hunting is for the hunter who are looking for a classic African trophy. The black horns, and the elegant expression, is highly sought-after for the first-time hunter in Africa. The typical type of hunting is a walk and stalk, where you will be glassing over the land, to find a good impala ram. The impala is a part of most fixed price packages when hunting in Africa, and the hunt is usually very exciting, due to the impalas living in large herds, with many eyes to spot the hunter. A real plains game challenge!

The impala is a medium-sized antelope, and can practically be found everywhere in the eastern- and southern parts of Africa. The impala ram has a beautiful set of horns that grows throughout their whole life, the same as most other antelopes. The horns are black and lyre-shaped. Only the ram carries horns, as it usually is in the antelope family. The rams use the shape of their horns when fighting, and for protecting their heads. At midday, the impala is often found lying in the shade, which can make the stalk easier.

Their trophy is very characteristic, and highly valued by most safari hunters. You will often be able to get a good look at the impala’s while you are looking for the strongest ram, or the right trophy to take. The trophy is evaluated by the length of the horns, and the width of the horns’ bases. The size of the horns can vary a lot from one region to another. Hunting the impala is a pleasure, and it is a ‘must-have’ trophy from the African continent.

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  • Impalas are very gracious and extremely agile
  • Stalking through light bush, and open plains, is the most common hunting type
  • As with many other antelopes, their heart is placed quite low

Common impala (Aepyceros melampus melampus) has one subspecies, the blackfaced impala. The common impala ram measures 30-37 inches over the shoulder, and weighs around 150 lbs. While the female weighs between 90-110 lbs. and measures 28-33 inches at shoulder height. The impala’s skin is the same reddish color as African sand, yet their lower belly is light brown and the inside of their legs is white. Impalas have three black stripes; one on each side of their rear, and one on the top of their tail.

Only the male ram carries horns, and these are black and slim. They are lyre-shaped, and grow longer with age. A trophy of more than 20 inches is considered a great trophy. The gracious looking animal is perfect for a shoulder mount, due to the elegant appearance. In order to score a medal, the trophy must obtain the following points:
Bronze: 52     Silver: 55½     Gold: 58 SCI

The foraging takes place during the whole day, but primarily in the morning and evening. The rams are fully grown at age four, and won’t be reproductive before that age. The females are already reproductive at one and a half years of age. The mating season is at the end of the rainy season, and lasts for up to three weeks. The female gives birth to a calf, and will stay with other breeding females, in a breeding herd.